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If you have ever watched or participated in dog training you may have realised that most of the training is actually focused on training the owner to behave in the right way, that then enables the dog to respond appropriately.

As part of our Enterprise Selling Programme we have a simple but really effective tool to help you take a strategic approach to account management – KARE.

With KARE, you analyse your accounts into one of four categories:

Keep: Those accounts that you want to retain but where there is no opportunity to grow that account further
Attain: Your wish list of clients you would like to work with
Recapture: Clients that you are no longer working with, that you would like reengage with
Expand: Existing clients that you want to Keep but where there is potential to increase the amount of business you do together

Most times you already know what objections you/your people are likely to face before you start a conversation.  As part of your pre-meeting planning take the time to figure those out and how you would handle them if they come up.

No doubt part of your growth plan for the business includes retaining and growing business from existing clients. Do you/your people have a consistent approach to these conversations to ensure they are meaningful and effective? If not, here is a simple 5 step process for how review meetings with existing clients, using the acronym RECON:

Last week I was a guest speaker at our Annual Client Summit in Orlando.  I spoke on a topic that I find fascinating which has broad application for anyone in business, regardless of role; lessons from sports psychology and neuroscience that we can apply to business. 

You’re meeting with a prospect. You’ve asked all the appropriate questions to uncover the prospect’s problem, concerns, desires, goals, and expectations. After fully analysing the situation, you announce with no hesitation whatsoever, “No problem. I have exactly what you need.”Add a little drama

Does the prospect gasp a sigh of relief, utter under his breath, “Thank goodness,” and pull a purchase order from the drawer? Perhaps in Grimm’s version of the story, but not in the real world.

Why?

All too frequently, salespeople schedule appointments…and then forget about them until the day before the scheduled dates. Do you? Is preparation a last-minute activity often consisting of nothing more than a quick review of the notes from the original phone conversations when the appointments were scheduled…and perhaps a review of the prospects’ websites, advertising, or marketing materials?

Can you answer the following questions about your next prospect appointment?

Recently, you probably invested a lot of time and energy putting together a presentation of your product or service. You crafted your presentation, dotted all the “i”s, crossed all the “t”s, covered all the bases, and answered all of the prospect’s questions. But, instead of a buying decision, you only received a stall, a put-off, or a request for some concession. At whom do you point the finger of blame?

Everyone knows someone. Actually, everyone knows several someone’s. Your customers – as well as the prospects you call on – have some contact with, or at the very least know of, people who can benefit from your product or service. Unfortunately, they are not programmed to automatically disclose the names of those people to you. That doesn’t mean that they won’t; you must initiate the action.

Salespeople invest time developing their pitch, formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. They rehearse, refine, and rehearse some more.