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Cambridge | crobinson@sandler.com
 

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Management & Leadership

Selling in a tough economy will separate those salespeople that ‘can’ and those that ‘can't’.

As a sales manager you need to know what to do when the economy starts to hit the brakes.

  • How do you ensure your sales team achieves their sales targets when the market is flat?
  • How do you as the sales leader plan to achieve your sales budget when there is so much indecision and fear in the market?
  • Think about it, do you really know how each of your salespeople are going perform in these troubled times?

 

The trouble is that we start discussing things in January, finalise plans sometime around April, it then takes a couple of months to get people and budgets in place by which time we’re into the summer holidays. So it’s hardly surprising then that we really get going on our annual plan sometime around September, we haven’t a hope of delivering the income that our January discussions envisaged.

If you have ever watched or participated in dog training you may have realised that most of the training is actually focused on training the owner to behave in the right way, that then enables the dog to respond appropriately.

We hire salespeople who claim good past results and appear professional and competent at interview and then they fail to hit agreed targets. Why is that?

One of the biggest leap a business owner takes is hiring that first employee. When is the right time? What role should they do? Can I afford it? How do I know they are the right person? All big questions to be overcome.

Typically when you ask a sales person to debrief a sales meeting/conversation they tell you a story, starting at the beginning of the conversation, going into detail about the meat of it and finally wrapping up with what happened at the end.

Small business owners tend to stay small because they do not install systems and processes into their business. Most owners want to hire “experienced” sales people. The mentality is to hire someone, teach them about their products and services, then expect the person to “go sell”. What’s the problem? If we hire experienced sales people, once they learn the product or service, they should be good to go, right?

I am a terrible “bah humbug!” when it comes to “trick or treat” but I do take a keen interest in Ghosts.